Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Brandon Lilly and myself - Part 5 - sub max training


From the JTS website..........

http://www.jtsstrength.com/articles/2013/07/19/lilly-and-carter-on-lifting-and-life-part-5/

12 comments:

  1. Hey Paul I been lurking around your site for a while and ran 8 weeks of big 15 and going to continue with it. I'm really liking it the back off sets. My higher rep projected maxes though always over shoot my true 1rm. I've always been good at pushing myself in higher reps. Do you think that in this case 70% is as useful for the sake of getting stronger? I've gotten up to 22 reps on weeks 1-2.. hope all that made sense. You run a great site with better information.

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    Replies
    1. Up the weight. 8-12 for upperbody work and 15-20 for lower body.

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  2. Hey Paul, you probably remember by now but Dave Jacoby is the guy you were thinking of that drove truck and trained once a week. Guy was jacked too - looked like a bodybuilder. Don't know if that was always how he trained throughout his career but supposedly that's how he did it for a time, at least.



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  3. Ok I want to beat this dead horse again.

    I posed my same question here: http://startingstrength.com/resources/forum/showthread.php?t=41587
    as I did with you in regard to low back overtraining.

    I also asked Rippetoe he told me to gain weight.

    so I got 3 different answers..

    My thoughts:

    Maybe the law of common sense has clouded my judgement. If my squat decreases steadily over time maybe sometime isn't right? My form hasn't changed, my weight hasn't changed, my bench went up, the low back is quickly and easily overtrained so...

    I don't know if gain 3,000 pounds and see what happens is the answer. Or that my low back has suddenly became weak and there goes my squat KEERR PLUNK. Why would my squat decrease if I added deadlifts to my training, my weight stayed constant, my form stayed constant, and my bench improved. I'm just looking for a more logical answer.

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    Replies
    1. Your squat decreased when you added deadlifts probably because your technique on deads is having you to use too much low back. Then on squat days, you're not recovered. My recommendation is to pull lighter than you have been, and back off on the squats by 10%, until you feel "speed" returning at that weight.

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    2. Jesus dude, is there anywhere you haven't posted this? I mean, you even did it in two different accounts on Rippetoe's forums. So you started deadlifting more and your squat suffered - EXPERIMENT. Think for yourself, don't just ask every single lifting luminary and pick your favourite answer.

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  4. Relentless, you sound flustered and desperate for answers. Do what Paul says. He was very nice to you and didn't chew your ass out like how those Starting strength guys did.

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  5. Yeah, they call me relentless.

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  6. Thought many of the S.S. posters were arrogant and took themselves too seriously. They sound/type like Rippetoe clones too. Only person I liked conversing with on the forum was "Spar", The Killer of Joy. Strong woman, very intelligent, and humble.

    I used to search endlessly on that forum for answers then I started coming here. And now I really don't have any more questions to ask anymore. Thanks Pauly.

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  7. I've discovered there arrogance very fast. I've reflected on my "low back problem" above and the squat decrease occurred when I went to Madcow, which is the first time I deadlifted but also the first time I squatted at a lesser intensity. So I think they nailed it over there - I need to pick the intensity back up. Paul gave me a good answer for the information I provided him.

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